2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (2023)

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Karnataka 2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet Questions and Answers, Notes, Summary

Romeo and Juliet Comprehension I

Question 1.
The phrase, “teach the torches to bum bright” suggests:
a. Juliet’s glow is brighter than the light of the torch.
b. her beauty is capable of enabling the torches to bum bright
c. her beauty surpasses the brightness of a light
Answer:
(c) her beauty surpasses the brightness of a light.

Question 2.
‘for earth too dear’ suggests that the lady’s beauty is
a. divine.
b. rare.
c. expensive.
Answer:
(a) divine.

Question 3.
‘the measure has done’, connotes the completion of
a. Romeo’s admiration of Juliet’s beauty.
b. the dance organised by Lord Capulet
c. the glorification of Juliet’s charm.
Answer:
(b) the dance organised by Lord Capulet

Question 4.
The line, ‘Did my heart love till now?’ conveys
a. Romeo feels he has fallen in love.
b. Romeo has been attracted before.
c. Romeo feels this is true love.
Answer:
(c) Romeo feels this is true love.

2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (1)

Question 5.
The phrase ‘new snow’, suggests
a. love as pure as snow.
b. description of Romeo’s charm.
c. Juliet’s discreet love for Romeo.
Answer:
(b) description of Romeo’s charm.

Question 6.
What do you think the phrase ‘face of heaven’ signifies?
Answer:
The phrase ‘face of heaven’ signifies the moonlit night sky.

Romeo and Juliet Comprehension II

Question 1.
What similes does Romeo use to convey Juliet’s beauty?
OR
Romeo’s appreciation of Juliet’s beauty is expressed through images. Explain.
Answer:
Romeo uses two similes to describe Juliet’s extraordinary beauty. The first simile is deployed in the lines

It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
As a rich jewel in an Ethiope’s ear.

In these lines, the phrases ‘cheek of the night’ and ‘Ethiope’s ear’ apparently refer to the darkness of the night personified as an African/Ethiopian lady. As we know, an African lady is black in complexion. Juliet stands out conspicuously amidst others in the dark night, lit up by torches in the room. There is a stark contrast between the bright and shining complexion of Juliet and the dark night.

The second simile is deployed in the lines:

So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows
As yonder lady o’er her fellow’s shows.

In these lines, the comparison is between the ‘snowy dove’ and the ‘crows’. Obviously Juliet is the snowy dove and the other ladies in the room are crows. ‘Dove’ is a symbol of ‘love’ and beauty; crows have always been considered black and ugly. Naturally, for Romeo, Juliet is the personification of love and beauty. It also implies that the other ladies including Rosaline, with whom he had fallen in love, appear ugly and gross to him. That is why he uses the phrase ‘her fellows, to describe them. These two similes highlight how enchanted Romeo is with her beauty.

Question 2.
How, according to Juliet, would Romeo be immortalised to the world?
OR
How does Juliet intend to make Romeo immortal?
OR
How does Juliet express her feelings about Romeo?
Answer:
In her invocation speech to ‘Night1 Juliet invokes night and along with ‘night’ her Romeo also. To her, Romeo is the ‘day’ in the night. It also implies that Romeo is her life and so when the night falls, she imagines that he will come gliding upon the wings of night. In these lines ‘night’ is personified as a raven and Romeo is likened to ‘new snow’ on a raven’s back Juliet favours the arrival of the night because it is in the night that Romeo has promised to come. That is why Juliet praises night calling it ‘gentle night’ and ‘loving black-browed night’.

Love belongs to Juliet now that she is married, but she does not own it, and she can’t own love until Romeo possesses her. Once she gets her Romeo she does not fear death. Like all mortals, if she dies, Juliet begs fate to set him in heaven with the stars. His presence will make the face of heaven so beautiful that the world will fall in love with ‘night’, and the sun will no longer be worshipped. It also implies that their love will end in their tragic death because of the enmity that exists between the two families. Consequently, the world will come to know about the tragic death of the two lovers and thus Romeo will be immortalized.

Romeo and Juliet Comprehension III

Question 1.
Comment on the contrasting imagery in the poem. What purpose does it serve in highlighting the intensity of love?
OR
How did Romeo and Juliet express their romantic love feelings to each other?
OR
Both Romeo and Juliet employ contrasting images in their expression of appreciation and admiration for each other. Elaborate.
Answer:
The two stanzas in the poem, one by Romeo and the other by Juliet, highlight the intensity of love of the young lovers. This intensity of love is brought out by using the contrasting imagery of night and day, black and white, bright jewel and a dark surface, snowy dove, etc. Factually speaking, the words ‘bright’ and ‘night’ appear in Romeo’s praise of Juliet’s brightness when he sees her for the first time in the feast hosted by Lord Capulet. Romeo uses the phrase ‘snowy dove’ to refer to and to distinguish Juliet from other ladies in the room. Romeo uses the word ‘crows’ to refer to the other ladies in the room.

Furthermore, Romeo compares Juliet’s brightness with ‘a rich jewel’ hanging upon the cheek of an Ethiope’s ear. Romeo uses these words to highlight her beauty. It also symbolizes the emotional intensity that he shows towards Juliet.

Similarly, Juliet uses the phrase ‘day in the night and ‘whiter than new snow on a raven’s back’ to refer to Romeo. Secondly, she uses the words ‘stars in the night sky’ to refer to Romeo. Literally speaking, both the meetings between Romeo and Juliet take place at night. Secondly, their meeting has to be a closely guarded secret because of the ‘hostility’ and the ‘enmity’ that exists between the two rival families the Montagues and the Capulets.

2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (2)

When Romeo goes to the Capulet*s party, he goes wearing a mask at night. Similarly, he promises to meet Juliet in her chamber on the wedding night, so as not to be seen by anyone. That is why the word ‘night’ symbolically stands for ‘secrecy’ and ‘caution’ that needs to be exercised in their love affair. Thus the playwright has used the word ‘black’ and ‘night’ to strengthen the emotional situation. Thematically speaking, the words ‘day and night’, ‘black and white’, ‘night’ and ‘raven’ are used to evoke the image of ‘death’ whereas ‘white dove’ is a symbol of purity, peace and ‘love’. A raven or a ‘black crow’ is considered a bird of ill-omen.

Furthermore, ‘When I shall die’ and ‘cut him out in little stars’, and ‘heaven’ are expressions that clearly refer to death and immortality. Thus, the playwright is hinting that the secret love affair between the two rivals will culminate in the tragic death of Romeo and Juliet. It can also be inferred that probably Juliet has a premonition of their impending death because of the fatal attraction between them and the enmity that exists between the two families. Thus, the contrasting imagery serves to highlight the intensity of their love.

Question 2.
Between Romeo and Juliet, whose love, do you think, is more passionate and intense?
Answer:
It is clear from their expressions that, of the two lovers, Juliet’s love is more passionate and intense. It is well-known that when Romeo goes to the Capulet’s party, it is with the intention of seeing Rosaline and not Juliet. When he sees Juliet for the first time his exclamations are of one who is overwhelmed by the sight of someone who is mesmerizingly (bewitchingly) beautiful and are not the yearnings of someone deeply in love.

On the other hand, when Juliet gets to know Romeo after he had touched her hand and kissed her, Juliet comes to understand what it means to be in love and from then onwards starts feeling the pangs of love. Finally, she expresses her love firmly, asking Romeo to marry her. Her love for Romeo goes on increasing in intensity and finally in her ‘invocation tonight* we find someone yearning to be possessed in love by her husband. She has a premonition of their tragic death which finds expression in her request to ‘night to set up Romeo amidst the stars in heaven after death so that their ‘love’ gets immortalized.

(Video) ROMEO AND JULIET [Questions and Answers]

It is also true that, of the two, though Juliet is younger than Romeo, she is more mature and passionate in deciding to get married to Romeo. She accepts Romeo as her partner despite being fully aware of the enmity that exists between the two families.

On the contrary, Romeo, though older than Juliet, is infatuated with Rosaline and is disappointed that she does not reciprocate his love. Only when he meets Juliet who reciprocates his love does he understand what it is to be really in love. Therefore, it can be concluded that it is Juliet who is more passionate and intense in love than Romeo.

Romeo and Juliet Additional Questions and Answers

I. Answer the following questions in a word, a phrase, or a sentence each:

Question 1.
Who, according to Romeo, teaches the torches to bum bright?
Answer:
Juliet.

Question 2.
To what does Romeo compare the women in the room other than Juliet?
Answer:
To crows.

Question 3.
What does Romeo intend to do after the measure is done?
OR
What does Romeo want to do as soon as the dance is over?
Answer:
Romeo intends to dance with her or at least touch her hand in greeting and make his blessed.

Question 4.
What, according to Romeo, will happen when he touches Juliet’s hand?
Answer:
Romeo imagines that his coarse hand will be blessed when he touches Juliet’s hand.

Question 5.
What, according to Romeo, was not seen by him until he saw Juliet?
Answer:
Borneo had not seen what true beauty was until he saw Juliet.

Question 6.
What does Juliet ask the loving, black-browed night to do?
Answer:
Juliet asks the loving, black-browed night to bring her Romeo to her.

Question 7.
When does Juliet want Romeo to be set up in heaven with the stars?
Answer:
Juliet wants Romeo to be set up in heaven with the stars after her death.

2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (3)

Question 8.
Why does Juliet call Romeo ‘day in the night’?
Answer:
Juliet calls Romeo ‘day in the night’ because his presence will shine out against the darkness.

Question 9.
Who will come gliding on the wings of the night?
Answer:
Romeo.

Question 10.
What does Juliet want Romeo to be after her death?
Answer:
Juliet wants Romeo to be set up in heaven amidst the stars.

Question 11.
How does Juliet want Romeo to be immortalised?
OR
How, according to Juliet, would Romeo be immortalised to the world?
Answer:
Juliet wants Romeo to be immortalised as stars in heaven.

Question 12.
Why will the world be in love with night?
Answer:
Romeo will make the face of heaven so fine that the world will fall in love with night.

Question 13.
Why will people stop paying attention to the sun?
Answer:
After being cut into little stars, Romeo will make the face of heaven so fine that the world will stop paying attention to the sun.

Question 14.
“For/never saw true beauty till this night” What does true beauty’ refer to?
OR
Whom does the phrase ‘true beauty’ refer to in ‘Romeo and Juliet’?
Answer:
Juliet’s beauty.

Question 15.
How does Juliet hang on the cheek of the night?
Answer:
Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope’s ear.

Question 16.
When, according to Romeo, would his hand be blessed?
Answer:
When Romeo touches Juliet’s hand in the dancing hall.

Question 17.
Whose rude hand would be made blessed by touching Juliet’s hand?
Answer:
Romeo’s rude hand would be made blessed when it touches Juliet’s hand.

Question 18.
Who is ‘whiter than new snow on a raven’s back’?
OR
Who, according to Juliet, is whiter than new snow?
Answer:
Romeo.

2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (4)

Question 19.
Who is compared to a ‘rich Jewel in an Ethiope’s ear’?
Answer:
Juliet.

Question 20.
Who is compared to a ‘snowy dove’?
OR
Whom does the phrase ‘snowy dove’ refer to?
OR
Who looks like a snowy dove to Romeo?
Answer:
Juliet.

Question 21.
Whom does Romeo address as ‘yonder lady’?
Answer:
Juliet.

Question 22.
Who, according to Juliet, would all the world be in love with at night?
Answer:
Romeo.

(Video) 2nd PUC English Chapter-1, 2nd PUC English Romeo and Juliet questions and Answers, 1, 4 & 6 Marks.

Question 23.
Who, according to Juliet, would make the face of heaven so fine?
Answer:
Romeo.

Question 24.
When would people not worship the garish sun, according to Juliet?
Answer:
After Juliet’s death, when Romeo goes to heaven as a star, he will make heaven so fine that people will stop worshipping the garish sun.

Question 25.
What does Juliet teach to bum bright?
Answer:
Juliet teaches the torches to bum bright

Question 26.
Who will come gliding on the wings of the night?
Answer:
Romeo.

Question 27.
When, according to Juliet, would all the world be in love with night?
Answer:
Juliet believes that Romeo, after being set up among the stars in heaven, will make the face of heaven beautiful and charming. Then, the whole world would fall in love with night.

Question 28.
Who, according to Romeo, seems to hang upon the cheek of the night?
Answer:
According to Romeo, Juliet seems to hang upon the cheek of night, like a jewelled earring hanging against the cheek of an Ethiopian lady.

Question 29.
Whose beauty, according to Romeo, is too rich for use?
Answer:
According to Romeo, it is Juliet’s beauty that is too rich for use.

Question 30.
After the dance is over, Romeo intends to
(a) meet and talk to Juliet
(b) touch Juliet’s hand.
(c) watch Juliet’s place of the stand.
Answer:
(b) touch Juliet’s hand.

Question 31.
Who is compared to crows by Romeo?
Answer:
Romeo compares Juliet to a white dove and the other ladies in the hall to a flock of crows.

2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (5)

Question 32.
When does Juliet expect Romeo to come?
Answer:
Juliet expects Romeo to come in the night

Question 33.
Who, according to Juliet, will lie upon the wings of the night?
Answer:
According to Juliet, Romeo will lie upon the wings of night and come gliding to her.

Question 34.
Where, according to Juliet, will Romeo lie upon?
Answer:
According to Juliet, Romeo will lie upon the back of a raven.

Question 35.
Who, according to Juliet, is whiter than new snow?
Answer:
According to Juliet, Romeo is whiter than new snow on the back of a raven.
OR
Romeo looks whiter than snow on the back of a raven.

Question 46.
Who, according to Juliet, is ‘day in the night’?
Answer:
According to Juliet, it is Romeo who is like ‘day in the night’.

Question 47.
When does Juliet want Romeo to be cut out in little stars?
Answer:
Juliet wants Romeo to be cut out in little stars after her death.

Question 48.
What does Juliet want Romeo to be cut out into after her death?
Answer:
After her death, Juliet wants Romeo to be cut out into little stars.

Question 49.
What, according to Juliet, will Romeo make so fine?
Answer:
Once Romeo is set up in heaven as a star, he will make the face of heaven so fine or beautiful and charming.

Question 50.
When Romeo shines like a star in the face of heaven, the world will ______ according to Juliet.
(a) worship the garish sun
(b) fall in love with night
(c) keep staring at heaven
Answer:
(b) fall in love with night.

Question 51.
When, according to Juliet, would all the world be in love with night?
Answer:
According to Juliet, when Romeo is set up as a star in the sky, he will make the face of heaven so fine that the world would be in love with night.

Question 52.
When would the world pay no worship to ‘the garish sun”, according to Juliet?
Answer:
According to Juliet, the world will pay no worship to the garish sun, only when the face of heaven looks fine.

Question 53.
Whom does Juliet associate with the ‘coming of the night’?
Answer:
Juliet associates Romeo with the ‘coming of the night’.

Question 54.
Whose beauty, according to Romeo, is too rich for use?
Answer:
According to Romeo, Juliet’s beauty is too rich for use.

II. Answer the following questions in a paragraph of 80-100 words each:

Question 1.
How does Romeo glorify Juliet’s flawless beauty?
OR
How does Romeo describe Juliet?
OR
How does Romeo describe Juliet’s beauty?
OR
How is Romeo mesmerised by the beauty of Juliet?
OR
Juliet’s beauty was too rich for use. How does Romeo describe it?
Answer:
The moment Romeo catches sight of Juliet, he is enchanted with her flawless beauty. Immediately he exclaims in wonder and says that she teaches the torches (that have lit up the room) to bum bright. Then noticing her conspicuous brightness in the night, he says that she appears like a precious jewel hanging in the ears of an Ethiopian. Finally, seeing that she outshone every other lady in the room, he says that she was like a snowy white dove trooping with crows. He tells himself that he had never felt so much in love because he had never seen anyone truly beautiful like Juliet until that night.

2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (6)

Question 2.
How does Juliet want people to forget the shining sun? Why?
Answer:
Juliet was eager to be with Romeo. So she invokes both the night and Romeo to come along with it so that he comes to her unseen by others. She believes that Romeo is ‘day in the night to her and hence his presence alone will make her night bright to her. Then, once she is possessed by Romeo, her ‘love’ will have been realized. Later, after her death, she wants the ‘night to set up Romeo amongst the stars so that he will make the face of heaven beautiful and make the people forget the shining sun. This way she wants their love to be immortalized.

(Video) ROMEO AND JULIET [2nd PUC] [ಕನ್ನಡದಲ್ಲಿ]

Question 3.
Does Romeo claim to have never seen true beauty till he saw Juliet How does he justify this statement?
OR
Why does Romeo say he never saw true beauty till that night? Explain.
OR
How did Romeo express his love for Juliet?
OR
‘Forswear it, sight
For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night’. Why does Romeo feel so? Explain.
Answer:
Romeo and Juliet happen to see each other for the first time in the hall where the dancers have gathered. The moment Romeo sets his eyes on Juliet, he is so charmed by her beauty that he stands apart and rapturously praises her beauty. It is night and the room is lit with torches. Romeo is overwhelmed by the beauty of Juliet and so he exclaims and says that Juliet is brighter than the blaze of the torches. Next, he compares Juliet to a jewelled earring hanging against the cheek of an African. He then praises her beauty likening Juliet to a white dove in the midst of a flock of crows.

He tells himself that he had never felt so much in love because he had never seen anyone truly beautiful like Juliet until that night. Romeo is so overwhelmed by her beauty that he tells himself that when that dance is over, he will watch her where she stands and will touch her hand and make his coarse hand blessed.

Question 4.
Why, according to Juliet, would all the world stop paying worship to the garish sun? Explain.
Answer:
Juliet, who has married Romeo in secret, is waiting impatiently for the arrival of night and along with it her love, Romeo, when their marriage will get consummated. Now, Juliet is intensely in love with Romeo and feels passionate for him to possess her so that she can own ‘love’. But the ‘day’ appears to be moving very slowly and she apparently blames the sun for delaying her union with Romeo. Secondly, her natural longing to be with Romeo makes her blame the sun for being ‘lurid’ and obtrusively bright

Once the night arrives, and along with it Romeo, their love gets consummated. After her death she expects Romeo to go to the heavens like a star. She believes that her Romeo will make the face of heaven so fine that the whole world will fall in love with night.

Question 5.
How is the intensity of love between Romeo and Juliet brought out in the poem?
OR
Feelings of Romeo and Juliet for each other are expressed with intensity. Discuss.
Answer:
The intensity of love between Romeo and Juliet is brought out in Juliet’s soliloquy in which she addresses Romeo as ‘day in the night’. She imagines night like a bird and believes that Romeo will come gliding on the wings of a night like ‘new snow’ on a raven’s back. Then, addressing the ‘night’ as ‘gentle night’ and ‘black-browed night, she implores it to bring her Romeo to her.

Next, she asks the night to set Romeo up in heaven as a star so that he will make the face of heaven beautiful and charming. She hopes that when that happens, ‘all the world will be in love with night and will not pay attention to the overbright or lurid sun’. In short, love belongs to Juliet now that she is married, but she does not own it, and she can’t own love until Romeo possesses her. That is why there are so much longing and impatience in her request tonight.

Question 6.
How does Juliet express her love for Romeo?
OR
How does Juliet express her feelings about Romeo?
Answer:
The intensity of love between Romeo and Juliet is brought out in Juliet’s soliloquy in which she addresses Romeo as ‘day in night1. She imagines night like a bird and believes that Romeo will come gliding on the wings of the night like ‘new snow’ on a raven’s back. Then, addressing the ‘night1 as ‘gentle night7 and ‘black-browed night’, she implores it to bring her Romeo to her. Next, she asks the night to set Romeo up in heaven as a star so that he will make the face of heaven beautiful and charming. She hopes that when that happens, ‘all the world will be in life with the night, and will not pay attention to the overbright or lurid sun’.

Question 7.
Why does Juliet want Romeo to be cut out in little stars?
Answer:
Once Juliet gets her Romeo, she does not fear death. Like all mortals, if she dies, Juliet begs fate to set him in heaven with the stars. His presence will make the face of heaven so beautiful that the world will fall in love with ‘night7, and the sun will no longer be worshipped. It also implies that their love will end in their tragic death because of the enmity that exists between the two families. Consequently, the world will come to know about the tragic death of the two lovers and thus Romeo will be immortalized.

Question 8.
How does Juliet glorify her love for Romeo through her address tonight?
Answer:
Soon after her marriage to Romeo, Juliet comes home and waits anxiously for the arrival of the night so that their love is consummated. She implores night to come soon and along with it bring her Romeo. Once she gets her Romeo she does not fear death. Like all mortals, if she dies, Juliet begs fate to set him in heaven with the stars. His presence will make the face of heaven so beautiful that the world will fall in love with ‘night’, and the sun will no longer be worshipped. It also implies that their love will end in their tragic death because of the enmity that exists between the two families. Consequently, the world will come to know about the tragic death of the two lovers and thus Romeo will be immortalized.

III. Answer the following questions in about 200 words each:

Question 1.
‘Romeo and Juliet’ provides an insight into the use of poetic devices in expressing human feelings. Explain.
Answer:
In this lesson, there are two soliloquies, one by Romeo and the other by Juliet. The first soliloquy is taken from Act I, Scene V and the second from Act III, Scene II of Romeo and Juliet1, a romantic tragedy by William Shakespeare. The language used by Shakespeare in these soliloquies is exceptionally creative and provides an insight into his use of poetic devices in expressing human feelings.

2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (7)

In Act, I, Scene V, Romeo is attending a dance party in disguise, as it is hosted by Old Lord Capulet. Romeo is seen gazing at some dancers on the dance floor. When Romeo sees Juliet, he is so fascinated by her beauty that he asks a servant who the lady is. When the servant tells him that he does not know who she is, Romeo stands apart and rapturously praises her beauty.
In this soliloquy, one witness the ebullient outpourings of a dreamy, young lover who has fallen in love with a beautiful, young lady, at first sight, Shakespeare captures both the excitement and wonder the lovers feel on this occasion, in an extraordinary language which abounds in poetic devices.

Line one is hyperbolic. The use of hyperbole is quite appropriate in this context because it is the voice of a young lover who sees before him a beautiful girl who symbolizes his aesthetic sense of what beauty ought to be like. Inline 2, Juliet is likened to an earring, thus making it a simile. The earring hangs upon the cheek of night. Here ‘night’ is personified as a black lady. Thus, we see the use of personification as a device. The meaning is stretched further in the next line, and thus in lines 2 and 3, we see the use of enjambment as a poetic device. (‘Enjambment’ refers to the running over of the sense and grammatical structure from one verse line or couplet to the next without a punctuated pause.) The extended meaning is expected to further highlight the beauty of Juliet using a sharp contrast in the description of the personified night as an Ethiopian lady’s ear-ring.

We find another instance of enjambment in lines 5 and 6. Dove is a symbol of love and a snowy dove is a symbol of peace. This highlights the pristine love of the two young lovers. The snowy dove is trooping with ‘crows’ is again a sharp contrast between the other ladies in the hall and the brightness of Juliet. This contrast is to present a striking visual spectacle before the audience.

Thus, the whole stretch of this soliloquy is an extended metaphor expressing the emotional intensity of a lover who has fallen in love at first sight. In the next two lines, in the phrases ‘my rude hand’ and ‘my heart we find the use of ‘synecdoche’. The word ‘rude’ is tactile imagery. In the last line, the word ‘Beauty’, is a metaphor for Juliet. Finally, in the sentence ‘Did my heart love till now?’ we find Romeo’s realization that his love for Rosaline was only infatuation – a sensual feeling for a lady and devoid of all emotions, whereas now he is in the throes of real love.

The next soliloquy is by Juliet (Act III Scene II). In this scene, Juliet is now waiting for Romeo. In this beautiful speech, we begin to understand the fullness of Juliet’s love.

In the first line, Juliet is addressing ‘night’ as an entity; night is personified. Thus there are two poetic devices used here – an apostrophe and personification. The poet wants to highlight Romeo’s brightness as seen by Juliet when he comes to visit her at the night.

Inline 1, ‘come, night; come, thou day in the night there is a form of parallelism called ‘asyndeton’. (It is a form of verbal compression which consists of the omission of connecting words between clauses.) Next, Juliet calls Romeo’s day-in-night’ which is a metaphor.

In the second line ‘night’ is personified as a bird. In the next line, the bird is mentioned as a ‘raven’, and Romeo’s brightness or white complexion is compared with new snow on the raven’s back. Here, there is a simile. In the fourth line also ‘night* is personified. Juliet describes the night as having black eyebrows, like a human being. Finally, in line 7, we see personification in the phrase ‘face of heaven’. Inline 8, we see the use of ‘metonymy’ in the phrase ‘all the world will be in love with the night’. It means to say that all the people in the world will be in love with night

Thus Shakespeare uses emotive language to associate it with the theme of love to demonstrate Romeo’s love/feelings for Juliet and to create drama. Thus one can undoubtedly say that ‘Romeo and Juliet’ provides an insight into the use of poetic devices.

Question 2.
Juliet’s love for Romeo finds an expression of exaggeration. Explain.
Answer:
It would be very unfair to Shakespeare’s mastery of poetic art and also to Juliet’s characterization if we were to conclude that Juliet’s love for Romeo finds expression in exaggeration. It is worth noting that both the actions – Romeo meeting Juliet in the dance hall and Juliet waiting for Romeo, happen at night Secondly, both the lovers are young, innocent, dreamy, and inexperienced in love. Both of them have entered a new world and until their love for each other is secured through consummation, the playwright cannot show them in any other mood other than portraying their longing for each other in emotive language. Moreover, both of them have fallen in love at first sight and naturally, their emotional outpourings must contain a description of their physical beauty.

Since it is a play, the playwright has to make his language overcharged with emotion so as to dramatize the situation. Naturally, Juliet’s language is hyperbolic. Though ‘hyperbole’ is generally defined as ‘exaggeration’, it is not in the ordinary sense. Here ’hyperbole’ is a poetic device and it has been appropriately used for enhancing the dramatic effect One must also remember that plays are meant to be performed. Therefore, while reading a play one must also visualize the action. Therefore, whatever Juliet says is not an exaggeration but the emotional outpourings of a young lady who has met her lover for the first time and that too only for a short time. In this context, her longing for Romeo comes out in poetic language.

In Juliet’s soliloquy in Act III scene II, Juliet is now waiting for Romeo. From this speech, we begin to understand the fullness of Juliet’s love. She desires the act of love, not just for the physical pleasure, but because it represents for her the pinnacle of marriage. Juliet has met a lover for the first time in her life and this experience of nascent love in an innocent, virgin maiden finds its best expression in this soliloquy.

In the first line, Juliet is addressing ‘night’ as an entity and night are personified. Thus there are two poetic devices used here – an apostrophe and personification. Here Shakespeare is using them for contrast and emphasis. The poet wants to highlight Romeo’s brightness as seen by Juliet when he comes to visit her at the night. Next, Juliet calls Romeo ‘day-in-night’ which is a metaphor.

In the second line, ‘night is personified as a bird. In the next line, the bird is mentioned as a ‘raven’, and Romeo’s brightness or white complexion is compared with the new snow on the raven’s back. Here, there is a simile. In the fourth line also ‘night’ is personified. Juliet describes the night as having black eyebrows, like a human being. In line 7 we see ‘personification’ in the phrase ‘face of heaven’. We see the use of‘metonymy’ in the phrase ‘the world will be in love with the night’, which means to say that all the people of the world will be in love with night In view of the situation that is being presented, exaggeration is quite appropriate.

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare About the Poet:

(Video) Romeo and Juliet | 2nd PUC | William Shakespeare| Quick revision |full marks guarantee

William Shakespeare was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language. He is often called England’s national poet and the ‘Bard of Avon’. He was born in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, in 1564. Very little is known about his life, but by 1592 he was j in London working as an actor and a dramatist. Between about 1590 and 1613, Shakespeare wrote at least 37 plays and collaborated on several more.

Many of these plays were very successful both at court and in the public playhouses. In 1613, Shakespeare retired from the theatre and returned to Stratford-upon-Avon. He died and was buried there in 1616.

Shakespeare wrote plays and poems. His plays, 37 in number, were comedies, histories, and tragedies. His 17 comedies include ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ and ‘The Merry Wives of Windsor’. Among his 10 history plays are ‘Henry V’ and ‘Richard III’. The most famous among his 10 tragedies are ‘Hamlet’, ‘Othello’, and ‘King Lear’. Shakespeare’s best-known poems are ‘Venus and Adonis’, ‘The Rape of Lucrece’ and the Sonnets, 154 in all.

Romeo and Juliet Summary in English

Background-I

‘Romeo and Juliet’ presents the tragic story of two young lovers Romeo and Juliet, who belong to two powerful noble families of Verona, the Montagues, and the Capulets. The two noble families harbour grudges against each other and have been fighting each other as sworn enemies for a long time.

2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (8)

The action starts with a street brawl between the servants of the two rival families, who are later joined by the heads of the families, the Montagues and the Capulets, themselves. Prince Escalus, 5 who arrives on the scene, admonishes them, restores order, and threatens death to any member of either family found indulging in street fights, in the future. Then he leaves the place taking Lord Capulet along with him.

Only Lord and Lady Montague and Benvolio, their nephew, remain there as the others depart. Lord Montague tells Benvolio that Romeo has been in a bad mood for quite a while, weeping and mooning, staying out all night but going into the house as soon as the sun rises, locking himself in his room with the curtains drawn as if to make ‘himself an artificial night’. Benvolio assures him that he will attempt to find out what is bothering Romeo.

Next, we find Paris, a young relative of Prince Escalus, engaged in a conversation with Lord Capulet. Paris wishes to marry 14-year-old Juliet, the only daughter of the Capulets. Lord Capulet tells Paris that Juliet is yet too young to marry, but tells Paris that he will not oppose the marriage if Paris can win Juliet’s consent. Incidentally, Lord Capulet invites Paris to a feast to be held at his house that evening.

Meanwhile, Benvolio meets Romeo and learns that Romeo is madly in love with Rosaline, who does not love him and insists on remaining chaste.
2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (9)
Next, we learn that Lord Capulet has given his servant a list of guests whom he has to see and ensure that they are invited to the Capulets’ party that evening. But the servant cannot read the names in the list and hence asks two strangers in the street to read. The two strangers are none other than Romeo and Benvolio. Romeo reads out the names of the guests and incidentally learns that fair Rosaline, with whom he is madly in love, is also one of the guests in the party. Romeo and Benvolio decide to ‘crash’ the party. As planned, Romeo and Benvolio gain entry into the party along with a retinue of masked entertainers and torchbearers.

While the guests are engaged in dancing, Romeo happens to see Juliet dancing with a gentleman. Romeo is awestruck by her beauty and tries to find out from a servant, who she is. It is at this juncture that Romeo says these lines.
The lines spoken by Romeo are taken from Act I Scene V when Romeo happens to see Juliet for the first time in the party hosted by the Capulets. Both Romeo and Juliet do not know each other.

Summary – I Romeo’s Speech

Romeo stands apart and rapturously praises her beauty. His words appear to come from someone who has not seen anyone so beautiful as Juliet before. It is night and the room is lit with torches. Romeo exclaims and says that Juliet is brighter than the blaze of the torches. It implies that her brightness outshines the torches and has lit up the hall. In the next two lines again there is a reference to the darkness of the night and the brightly shining lady. Romeo compares Juliet to a jewelled earring hanging against the cheek of an African.

Here again, it implies that Juliet is conspicuously seen amidst others because of her brightness. Romeo is so enchanted with her goddess-like beauty that he declares that she is too beautiful for this world and too beautiful to die and be buried. In the next line, he eulogizes her beauty saying that she outshines the other women like a white dove in the middle of a flock of crows.

Romeo is so overwhelmed by her beauty that he tells himself that when that dance is over, he will watch her where she stands and will touch her hand and make his coarse hand (compared to Juliet’s) blessed. Then he asks himself a question whether his heart loved anyone before that moment. Then he tells himself that if it was true then he would renounce it because he had never felt so much in love because he had never seen anyone truly beautiful like Juliet until that night.

Background-II

(Having slipped away from his friends, Romeo lingers in Capulet s garden under Juliet’s window, and overhears her confess to the stars that she loves him. He reveals his presence to her, and in an ardent love scene, they resolve to be married secretly. The next day, Juliet sends her nurse, of whom she has made a confidante, to make final arrangements, and the wedding is performed at the cell of Friar Laurence, Romeo’s friend. The two lovers depart hoping to meet each other in Juliet’s chamber that night.

Returning from his wedding, Romeo comes upon his friends, Benvolio and Mercutio, in an altercation with Tybalt, who has been seeking Romeo because of his intrusion at the ball. Tybalt does his best to pick a fight, but Romeo, remembering that now Tybalt is his kinsman, refuses to quarrel.

Mercutio, however, who do not understand Romeo’s softness, takes the quarrel upon himself, and when Romeo and Benvolio try to beat down their weapons is slain by Tybalt. Aroused by the death of his best friend, Romeo throws aside his lenity, slays Tybalt, and flees as the angry citizens begin to gather.

Then we come to Act III Scene II, where we find Juliet waiting in her father’s orchard for her husband, Romeo’s, arrival. Juliet, unaware of what has just happened, waits out the passing of the day. She is more impatient than ever, for, that night Romeo is to come to her as her husband. At the opening of the scene, Juliet delivers an impassioned soliloquy, popularly known as ‘Juliet’s invocation to the night’. In her soliloquy, Juliet urges the sun on to its setting in the West, so that night may arrive sooner. She longs for the shelter of darkness when Romeo can come to her unseen. The dark suits lovers, for love, is blind and the beauty of lovers is enough light for them. There are 31 lines in this soliloquy but only 9 lines (lines 17 to 25) are prescribed for your study.

Whereas Romeo’s speech highlights the mesmerising physical beauty of Juliet, Juliet’s soliloquy highlights Juliet’s intensity of love for Romeo.

Summary-II Juliet’s soliloquy

In these nine lines, Juliet invokes both ‘night’ and ‘Romeo’ as well. She addresses Romeo as ‘day in the night’ because his presence will shine out against the darkness. She visualizes night like a bird j and believes that Romeo will come gliding on the wings of the night like ‘new snow’ on a raven’s back. She addresses the night appealingly calling it ‘gentle night’ and ‘black-browed night’. She implores it to bring her Romeo to her. After that, when she dies, she asks the night to take him and set him up in heaven with the stars so that he will make the face of heaven beautiful and charming. She hopes that when that happens ‘all the world will be in love with night, and it will not pay attention to the overbright or lurid sun.

2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (10)

The soliloquy is based on the unifying images of night and light. Juliet courts this night, which by its darkness will allow Romeo’s safe journey to her. The only light she needs is Romeo himself, who is ‘day in the night’. The light of the day and the ‘garish sun’ offer nothing to her; they are only ‘tedious’. It is a night that is ‘loving’, for it blesses her love with its darkness and silence and lets that love shine out. Even the stars, emblems of the fate she does not recognize, seem to be good to her. Romeo will be made eternal by the stars. Juliet’s speech is like singing in the face of death. Thus, Juliet hastens the coming of her wedding night.

In short, love belongs to Juliet, now that she is married, but she does not own it, and she can’t own love until Romeo possesses her. That is why she is waiting now as impatiently as a child waits for a festival.

Romeo and Juliet Summary in Kannada

2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (11)
2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (12)
2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (13)
2nd PUC English Textbook Answers Springs Chapter 1 Romeo and Juliet - KSEEB Solutions (14)

(Video) Romeo and Juliet Summary in English.[2nd PUC]

Glossary:

  • Doth (archaic): does
  • Ethiopia: an African
  • Yonder: over there
  • Measure dene: dance ended
  • Thou (archaic): you
  • Rude: roughly formed
  • Garish: lurid, obtrusively bright
  • too rich for use: too splendid for common wear
  • my rude hand: my hand which will be guilty of profanity in venturing to touch hers
  • forswear it, sight: he appeals to his eyes to disclaim having ever before seen real beauty

FAQs

Where did Romeo see Juliet first time 2nd PUC? ›

Ans: Romeo sees Juliet on the dance floor among a group of beautiful women. He is, at once, fascinated by her beauty and falls in love with her. He feels he has not seen a lady more beautiful than Juliet. To him she is a rich jewel that shines bright.

What does Romeo compare Juliet to 2nd PUC? ›

In these lines, the comparison is between the 'snowy dove' and the 'crows'. Obviously Juliet is the snowy dove and the other ladies in the room are crows.

How does Romeo describe Juliet 4 marks? ›

Romeo initially describes Juliet as a source of light, like a star, against the darkness: "she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night." As the play progresses, a cloak of interwoven light and dark images is cast around the pair.

How does Romeo describe Juliet beauty 2nd PUC? ›

He compares Juliet's beauty to nature. Romeo says that even the bright light of a torch would look dull before the brightness of Juliet. It looks like she hangs on the cheek of night. Romeo says that the beauty of Juliet is like a jewel that is hung in the ear of an African woman.

Is Romeo Juliet real story? ›

The story is, indeed, based on the life of two real lovers who lived and died for each other in Verona, Italy in 1303. Shakespeare is known to have discovered this tragic love story in Arthur Brooke's 1562 poem entitled “The Tragical History of Romeo and Juliet”.

How did Romeo Juliet end? ›

Romeo goes to the tomb and realises he can't live without Juliet. He takes the poison and dies next to her. Juliet wakes up and sees Romeo dead. She then kills herself with Romeo's dagger.

Is Juliet in love with Romeo? ›

Juliet's love for Romeo seems at least in part to be a desire to be freed from her parents' control by a husband who can't control her either. More experienced characters argue that sexual frustration, not enduring love, is the root cause of Romeo and Juliet's passion for one another.

What happens in 2.5 of Romeo and Juliet? ›

Synopsis: Juliet waits impatiently for the Nurse to return. Her impatience grows when the Nurse, having returned, is slow to deliver Romeo's message. Finally Juliet learns that if she wants to marry Romeo, she need only go to Friar Lawrence's cell that afternoon.

Is Romeo and Juliet both boys? ›

In the beginning of the play, Romeo, the male protagonist, pines for an unrequited love, Rosaline. To cheer him up, his cousin and friend Benvolio and Mercutio take him to the Capulets' celebration in disguise, where he meets and falls in love with the Capulets' only daughter, Juliet.

What happens in 4.3 in Romeo and Juliet? ›

Summary: Deciding that it's now or never, Juliet sends the nurse away and takes the potion, knowing how terrifying it will be to wake up in her family's tomb. If the mixture doesn't work, she has a plan B: her dagger. She's also worried that the potion might actually be poison, but decides to trust Friar Lawrence.

What is Romeo identity? ›

Therefore, Romeo's defiance against his initial identity as a Montague, and the appearance of his new peaceful one, leads to an extreme conflict between Mercutio and Tybalt.

What is Juliet in Act 4? ›

Juliet consents to the plan wholeheartedly. Friar Lawrence gives her the sleeping potion. Juliet returns home, where she finds Capulet and Lady Capulet preparing for the wedding. She surprises her parents by repenting her disobedience and cheerfully agreeing to marry Paris.

How beautiful is Juliet? ›

He says her "beauty too rich for use, for earth to dear." Compared to the other women at the party, Juliet is like a white dove among crows. He famously says he "ne'er saw true beauty till this night." In Act II, during the famous balcony scene, Romeo glorifies Juliet's beauty by saying Juliet is the sun.

What is Juliet view on love? ›

Juliet's attitude toward love is passionate, fulfilling, committed, and affectionate. She views love as finding her one match and doing anything for that person until the end of time. A perfect example of her attitude toward love is when Romeo killed Tybalt. Juliet can forgive him easily.

Why was Monaco called Toy Kingdom? ›

Answer: Monaco was called a toy Kingdom because it was a tiny little Kingdom with a population of only seven thousand people. Name the commodities taxed in Monaco. Answer: The commodities taxed in Monaco were tobacco, wine, and spirits and there was also a poll-tax.

How old was Romeo? ›

In Shakespeare's original story, Romeo is given the age of 16 years and Juliet is given the age of 13 years. The Montague and Capulet families originated in the Divine Comedy by the Italian author Dante Aligheri, rather than in Shakespeare.

Is Romeo and Juliet still alive? ›

Romeo takes his poison and dies, while Juliet awakens from her drugged coma. She learns what has happened from Friar Laurence, but she refuses to leave the tomb and stabs herself.

Is Romeo and Juliet 3 days? ›

Encapsulating the tragedy, within a span of three to four days Romeo and Juliet fall in love, get married and die 'for each other', besides triggering other deaths.

How old was Romeo when Juliet died? ›

Romeo and Juliet were teenagers when they died in the play Romeo and Juliet, with Juliet being thirteen years old, nearly fourteen. We do not know Romeo's age; he is treated as a man and, but described as young and appears to be youthful. He could be anywhere from fifteen to twenty, even slightly younger or older.

Do Romeo and Juliet Get married? ›

After the party Romeo climbs over the Capulet's garden wall in order to spend more time with Juliet. She appears on her balcony and they declare their love for each other. Knowing that their families are sworn enemies, they decide to get married in secret.

Why did Romeo drink the poison? ›

Romeo fights with him and leaves him dead. He breaks into the Capulet tomb and discovers Juliet, as cold as if she were dead. Romeo is heartbroken. He drinks his poison and dies.

Does Romeo and Juliet kiss? ›

Romeo arrives and sees Juliet dancing with someone. Romeo is overheard talking about Juliet by Tybalt. Tybalt wants to remove Romeo from the party but Lord Capulet stops him. Romeo and Juliet meet and kiss each other before the Nurse calls Juliet away.

Did Romeo sleep with Juliet? ›

At the beginning of Act III, scene v, Romeo and Juliet are together in Juliet's bed just before dawn, having spent the night with each other and feeling reluctant to separate. We might conclude that we're meant to infer that they just had sex, and that may be the way the scene is most commonly understood.

Why did Juliet not marry Paris? ›

Because she is in love with Romeo, and secretly marries him, she cannot marry Paris, nor does she want to.

When did Romeo marry Juliet? ›

Act 2, scene 3.

Does Romeo marry Juliet Act 2? ›

Juliet enters and Romeo asks her to speak poetically of her love. Juliet responds that those who can so easily describe their “worth” are beggars, her love is far too great to be so easily described. The lovers exit with Friar Lawrence and are wed.

How does Romeo and Juliet 3 end? ›

Mercutio goads Tybalt into a duel, which Romeo tries and fails to stop. Tybalt stabs Mercutio, who in his dying moments curses both the Montague and Capulet houses. Benvolio informs Romeo that Mercutio is dead; upon re-encountering Tybalt, Romeo fights and kills him.

Is Romeo a girl? ›

Romeo Montague (Italian: Romeo Montecchi) is the male protagonist of William Shakespeare's tragedy Romeo and Juliet. The son of Lord Montague and his wife, Lady Montague, he secretly loves and marries Juliet, a member of the rival House of Capulet, through a priest named Friar Laurence.

Is Juliet male or female? ›

Juliet Capulet (Italian: Giulietta Capuleti) is the female protagonist in William Shakespeare's romantic tragedy Romeo and Juliet. A 13-year-old girl, Juliet is the only daughter of the patriarch of the House of Capulet.

Who married Romeo and Juliet? ›

Friar Laurence is a Franciscan friar and a mentor to Romeo and Juliet. He secretly marries them, hoping to broker peace between the two families.

› wiki › Romeo_and_Juliet ›


Romeo and Juliet

https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Romeo_and_Juliet
https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Romeo_and_Juliet
Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare early in his career about two young Italian star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile t...
Prince Escalus underscores this unity of love and death when he chastises Capulet and Montague: “See what a scourge is laid upon your hate, / That Heaven finds ...

Summary of Romeo and Juliet

https://www.shakespeare.org.uk › shakespeares-plays › ro...
https://www.shakespeare.org.uk › shakespeares-plays › ro...
A complete summary of William Shakespeare's Play, Romeo & Juliet. Find out more about the classic story of two feuding families and a young couple's...

Where did Romeo first see Juliet? ›

Juliet and Romeo meet and fall instantly in love at a masked ball of the Capulets, and they profess their love when Romeo, unwilling to leave, climbs the wall into the orchard garden of her family's house and finds her alone at her window.

Where does Romeo see Juliet at the beginning of this scene? ›

This scene takes place outside the Capulet orchard. Romeo hopes to see Juliet again after falling in love with her at first sight during the Capulet masquerade ball. He leaps the orchard wall when he hears Mercutioand Benvolio approaching.

How did Romeo first see Juliet? ›

Romeo and Juliet's First Meeting

Romeo arrives and sees Juliet dancing with someone. Romeo is overheard talking about Juliet by Tybalt. Tybalt wants to remove Romeo from the party but Lord Capulet stops him. Romeo and Juliet meet and kiss each other before the Nurse calls Juliet away.

What scene does Romeo see Juliet for the first time? ›

Act 1, scene 5.

How old is Juliet? ›

In Shakespeare's original story, Romeo is given the age of 16 years and Juliet is given the age of 13 years. The Montague and Capulet families originated in the Divine Comedy by the Italian author Dante Aligheri, rather than in Shakespeare.

How old was Romeo when Juliet died? ›

Romeo and Juliet were teenagers when they died in the play Romeo and Juliet, with Juliet being thirteen years old, nearly fourteen. We do not know Romeo's age; he is treated as a man and, but described as young and appears to be youthful. He could be anywhere from fifteen to twenty, even slightly younger or older.

What does Romeo call Juliet? ›

Romeo says that Juliet is just like an angel because she stands on the balcony above his head. He says she is just as magnificent as an angel flying above in the air. And sails upon the bosom of the air.

Who did Romeo love before Juliet? ›

Role in the play

Before Romeo meets Juliet, he loves Rosaline, Capulet's niece and Juliet's cousin.

What is Juliet's enemy? ›

Juliet, musing to herself and unaware that Romeo is in her garden, asks why Romeo must be Romeo—a Montague, and therefore an enemy to her family. She says that if he would refuse his Montague name, she would give herself to him; or if he would simply swear that he loved her, she would refuse her Capulet name.

Who is Juliet's cousin? ›

Tybalt is the nephew of Lady Capulet and Juliet's cousin. The Nurse also considers him her best friend. Hot-headed and proud, Tybalt is always a troublemaker.

What was Romeo's dream? ›

Summary and Analysis Act V: Scene 1. In Mantua, Romeo mistakenly believes that his dreams portend good news because he dreamed that Julietfound him dead but revived him with her kisses. Romeo's servant, Balthasar, then reports to Romeo that Juliet has died.

Where do Romeo and Juliet Get married? ›

Romeo and Juliet meet at Friar Laurence's cell and get married. Shakespeare doesn't actually show the wedding ceremony on stage, but many productions do.

When did Romeo fall in love with Juliet? ›

Romeo is persuaded to attend a masked party at the Capulet household. Not knowing who she is, he falls in love with Juliet the moment he sees her, and she, equally ignorant that he is a Montague, falls just as instantly for him (this is Act 1, Scene 5 in many editions).

When did Romeo and Juliet Get married? ›

On this day in 1302, Romeo and Juliet were married, according to Shakespeare. A real couple named Romeo Montocchio and Juliet Capelletto were married in the walled city of Cittadella in Italy.

How did Romeo and Juliet fall in love? ›

Montague's son Romeo and his friends (Benvolio and Mercutio) hear of the party and resolve to go in disguise. Romeo hopes to see his beloved Rosaline at the party. Instead, while there, he meets Juliet and falls instantly in love with her.

What is Juliet's fate? ›

Juliet killed herself because she couldn't bear the death of her only husband. Fate has set all of these events, in perfect order to unite the Capulets and the Montagues. Fate is an inevitable force used as a special character, unseen and unheard, but there nonetheless.

› explanation › where-does-r... ›

William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet takes place mostly in the Italian city of Verona, also known as the ''city of love.'' The playwr...
Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare between 1591-1595, and it remains one of his most popular and frequently performed plays. The roman...
William Shakespeare. Summary of the plot or story. Shakespeare's tragic drama of the "star-crossed" young lovers Romeo Montague and Juliet Capulet...

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